Theory or Operation of Inductive Proximity Sensors | How Inductive Proximity Sensor Works?

Theory or Operation of Inductive Proximity Sensors | How Inductive Proximity Sensor Works?

 In this section we will look at Inductive proximity sensors, and how they detect the presence of an object without coming into physical
contact with it. Inductive proximity sensors are available in a variety of sizes and configurations to meet varying applications. Specific sensors will be
covered in more detailed in the following section.

Proximity Sensor
Proximity Sensor


Electromagnetic Coil and Metal Target

 The sensor incorporates an electromagnetic coil which is used to detect the presence of a conductive metal object. The sensor will ignore the
presence of an object if it is not metal.

 


 

Inductive proximity sensors are operated using an Eddy Current Killed Oscillator (ECKO) principle. This type of sensor consists of four
elements: coil, oscillator, trigger circuit, and an output. The oscillator is an inductive capacitive tuned circuit that creates a radio frequency. The
electromagnetic field produced by the oscillator is emitted from the coil away from the face of the sensor. The circuit has just enough feedback from the
field to keep the oscillator going. 
When a metal target enters the field, eddy currents circulate within the target. This causes a load on the sensor, decreasing the amplitude of the
electromagnetic field. As the target approaches the sensor the eddy currents increase, increasing the load on the oscillator and further decreasing the
amplitude of the field. The trigger circuit monitors the oscillator’s amplitude and at a predetermined level switches the output state of the sensor from its
normal condition (on or off). As the target moves away from the sensor, the oscillator’s amplitude increases. At a predetermined level the trigger switches
the output state of the sensor back to its normal condition (on or off).

 

 

 

Operating Voltages 

 Inductive proximity sensors include AC, DC, and AC/DC (universal voltage) models. The basic operating voltage ranges are from 10 to 30 VDC, 15
to 34 VDC, 10 to 65 VDC, 20 to 320 VDC, and 20 to 265 VAC.

Output Configurations 

 Three-wire, DC proximity sensor can either be PNP (sourcing) or NPN (sinking). This refers to the type of transistor used in the output switching
of the transistor. The following drawing illustrates the output stage of a PNP sensor. The load is connected between the output (A) and the negative side of the power
supply (L-). A PNP transistor switches the load to the positive side of the power supply (L+). When the transistor switches on, a complete path of current flow
exists from L- through the load to L+. This is also referred to as current sourcing since in this configuration conventional current is (+ to -) sourced to the
load. This terminology is often confusing to new users of sensors since electron current flow (-to +) is from the load into the sensor when the PNP transistor
turns on.

 

 

The following drawing illustrates the output of an NPN sensor. The load is connected between the output (A) and the positive side of the power
supply (L+). An NPN transistor switches the load to the negative side of the power supply (L-). This is also referred to as current sinking since the
direction of conventional current is into the sensor when the transistor turns on. Again, the flow of electron current is in the opposite direction.

 

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